Personal Branding: Be an Advocate for Yourself

While your everyday job may offer various opportunities to be an advocate for your industry, company, or products and services, how often do you advocate for yourself and work on improving your personal brand? A personal brand is how you portray yourself both online and in person. As with a company brand, your personal brand should be consistent across all channels and should represent who you are.

iStock_000014300896_Small1. Decide what you stand for.
First, determine who you are, what your values are, and how you want to represent yourself. Choose three to five values that guide your moral compass, and design a strategy from there. Personally, I would use “trustworthy,” “committed,” and “respectful” to describe myself.

In my role as staff liaison to IMA’s technical advisory committees, these three values are essential. I conduct myself in a way that committee members have faith in how I communicate and respect their position on technical issues that impact the management accounting profession.

2. Share relevant content often.
Always be careful of what you post on a public social media profile. Delete inappropriate pictures or content on your profile that might discredit you, or make your profile private. Instead, post blogs or articles you wrote or share relevant research in your field. This will show your enthusiasm for knowledge sharing and career development. Creating a posting plan will help you stay organized and ensure you maintain a healthy stream of content.

It’s also important to share content with your coworkers who may have similar interests. This knowledge sharing at work can boost your reputation and can prove your integrity as an expert in your field. In turn, your coworkers might advocate for you as well.

3. Network and get involved with groups that interest you.
Connect with companies and causes you’re interested in to show what you’re passionate about outside of work. Not only will this boost your brand, but connecting with these companies online will give you real-time news updates and research in your news feed. You’ll also stay informed with industry networking events and meetings.

For example, I follow IMA® and Fairleigh Dickinson University, my alma mater, on LinkedIn. It’s a great way to stay connected with my company and what’s going on with other alumni at the University. I use the discussion forums as networking opportunities and as a way to search for in-person events the alumni association holds.

Your Personal Brand at Work
Becoming a self-advocate means you stick to your values. Since mobile apps are so readily available, your digital persona is at your fingertips 24/7. It’s very easy to share information these days. You can use it to your advantage, but don’t lose sight of your values and what you stand for. Being a professional online is just as important as acting professionally in person. As we become more and more tech savvy, don’t forget about the value of in-person connections. These interactions can leave impressions stronger than any digital footprint.

Written by Linda Devonish-Mills, CMA, CPA, CAE

Related Articles:
The Value Of Personal Branding For Small Business – Forbes
5 Steps to Fix Your Personal Brand When Insults Stick – Entrepreneur

3 Things To Never Procrastinate On

Career development is a lifelong commitment of professional and personal growth. We know that staying current and improving our skills in the competitive environment is important for having a long and fulfilling career, yet many of us still procrastinate on this important area. Take some time to reflect on your career and consider three career development areas:

1. Getting Certified
As someone who earned his CMA® (Certified Management Accountant) certification while working full time, I advise anyone interested in pursuing a certification to start now. The sooner you earn a professional certification the better. Studying for exams while working full-time is a challenge, but with disciplined time management, it can be done. The upside potential is certainly worth it. Having a prestigious certification signals to employers your competency and expertise in your field, so why wait? Procrastinating on something as important as earning a credential can be detrimental to your career.

Students can start their certification jourstudent teacherney while still in school, too. Strategic Finance published an article in August that explains how students can complete the CMA and CPA exams within six months of graduating college.

2. Continuing Education
No matter what field you work in, you need continuing education to stay current on the job. If you hold a certification, like the CMA, you’re required to earn continuing professional education (CPE) credit each year, and you should always be thinking of ways to earn those credits. For example, make a schedule of courses or events you plan to attend throughout the year. This breakdown can show you how many credits you should earn, say, per month in order to reach your goal. IMA members have access to an online transcript that can help them keep track of their CPE. I encourage everyone to use this.

There are many ways you can earn CPE credit. IMA offers a wide variety of courses and webinars in our online store that are worth NASBA-approved CPE. For example, the IMA Ethics Series: Blinded by Pressure is our latest interactive course, which also fulfills the annual ethics CPE requirement for CMAs.

3. Planning For the Future
No matter where you are in your career, planning is essential for a bright future. Young professionals can outline a development plan for their skills and careers – where they want to be in five, 10, and 15 years. Mid-career professionals can develop a plan to get to the next level, whether it is to earn a certification or higher-education degree. And individuals looking to retire have an important job to do for succession planning.

To aid in this journey, IMA just launched a new career development tool called PrintCareerDriver. The simple three-step process allows you to evaluate your skills, build an actionable development plan based on your “Areas for Development,” and explore new career paths. This is a valuable tool for anyone looking to take control of their career and take the guesswork out of career planning.

“A Goal Without a Plan Is Just a Wish”
Antoine de Saint-Exupery, a French writer during the early 20th Century, had the right idea. You can’t be successful in your career if you don’t plan for success. Planning CPE courses or exam study time throughout the year can help you set (and achieve) small goals. Waiting until the last minute to earn CPE credit or enroll in the CMA program can be stressful. So don’t wait until the last minute to start your career journey and get to where you want to be.

Written by Dennis Whitney, CMA, CFM, CAE
Follow me on twitter: @IMA_DWhitney

Related Articles
“5 Great Alternatives to Getting Your MBA” – Skilledup.com
IMA Online Store, Course Catalog – IMA